Reblogged from The Khooll
Tags: wow
bpod-mrc:

22 August 2014
Superman Remembered
Christopher Reeve, the actor who still incarnates Superman for a whole generation, died in 2004 of complications ten years after crushing vertebrae in his neck while horse-riding. The accident snapped nerves in his spinal cord linking the brain to muscles in his chest and limbs, leaving him paralysed below the shoulders and unable to breathe unassisted. Befitting Superman, Reeve fought relentlessly for more research into stem cells' promise to re-grow nerves. Ten years on, biologists report increasingly successful experiments where stem cells grafted into damaged spines sprout extensive networks of nerve fibres. In this rat spine cross-section, human iPSC stem cells from an 86-year-old patient showcase the power of regenerative medicine as the cells unfurl long new fibres (blue speckles) along the length of the spine – though stopping short of bridging the wound to restore motor function – but crucially, connecting to existing nerves. Superman, are you watching from planet Krypton?
Written by Tristan Farrow
—
Image by Mark Tuszynski and colleaguesUniversity of California, San Diego, USACopyright Elsevier 2014Research published in Neuron, August 2014
—
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bpod-mrc:

22 August 2014

Superman Remembered

Christopher Reeve, the actor who still incarnates Superman for a whole generation, died in 2004 of complications ten years after crushing vertebrae in his neck while horse-riding. The accident snapped nerves in his spinal cord linking the brain to muscles in his chest and limbs, leaving him paralysed below the shoulders and unable to breathe unassisted. Befitting Superman, Reeve fought relentlessly for more research into stem cells' promise to re-grow nerves. Ten years on, biologists report increasingly successful experiments where stem cells grafted into damaged spines sprout extensive networks of nerve fibres. In this rat spine cross-section, human iPSC stem cells from an 86-year-old patient showcase the power of regenerative medicine as the cells unfurl long new fibres (blue speckles) along the length of the spine – though stopping short of bridging the wound to restore motor function – but crucially, connecting to existing nerves. Superman, are you watching from planet Krypton?

Written by Tristan Farrow

Image by Mark Tuszynski and colleagues
University of California, San Diego, USA
Copyright Elsevier 2014
Research published in Neuron, August 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

Reblogged from BPoD

juliawiinchester:

muirin007:

rainbowsmudge:

deanwinchestersshortshorts:

ys-ella:

maestremadness:

my-british-soul:

lado-sur:

renal-agenesis:

The Game of Life.

oh my god

what an interesting way to look at things.

lifes a gamble

and death always wins

because death has nothing to lose

wow.

Or maybe because Death’s a cheating whore look at that fuck hiding cards under his bony ass

HO GAWD

Hands down, one of my favorite pieces ever.

You can’t cheat death.. But that doesn’t mean death can’t cheat you

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catsbeaversandducks:

10 Cats That Are So Screwed Because The Floor Is Lava

iambluedog:

it wet

iambluedog:

it wet

Reblogged from Lift,Fuck,Eat,Sleep
Reblogged from Motorcycles
dredreaplayagonzo:

ultrafacts:

For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts (Source)

Imma use this one ! You have to remember its mind game & to put your ego aside.

dredreaplayagonzo:

ultrafacts:

For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts (Source)

Imma use this one ! You have to remember its mind game & to put your ego aside.

Reblogged from Ultrafacts.tumblr.com